Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Twitter! Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Facebook! Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Google +! Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on You Tube! Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Pinterest! Check out Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Instagram!
Read Our Reviews! Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Facebook! Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Google My Business! Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Twitter!  Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Citysearch! Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on SuperPages!  Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Yahoo! Local!  Review Mehndi Madness Henna Tattoos for the Masses on Yelp! 

Mehndi MadnessTM Blog

Dipping Fingers in Henna
By: Krysteen Lomonaco ~ 10/8/2014

By now Iím sure you Mehndi Madness addicts have seen designs that incorporate dyed fingertips. We became curious as to where that comes from and what it means to the people who wear them. Through research, we found that dipped fingers can come with a ritual but are also worn as simple decoration. Traditionally, Indian dancers would stain their palms and fingertips with bold designs, like dipped fingers, in order to draw attention to their hands. It is also commonly applied as an alternative to nail polish. The only downside to wearing henna as nail polish is that it is permanent until the henna grows out and can take up to four months to do so.

Ritualistically, the Mountain Jews of Azerbaijan women dip their fingertips in henna during the henna ceremony, or Juhuri.  A bowl of henna is prepared with a needle and silver coin in it to ward off the evil eye and bring prosperity. The bowl is passed around while each woman dips their fingertips in the henna, a blessing is said to the bride. Once all the women are dyed, it is the brideís turn. While she is dipping her fingertips in the henna, a prayer is said.  A similar ceremony was practiced in Georgia before the early 20th century.

Christian Armenians also practice a henna ceremony that involved all women in the bridal party, even children. The priest applies the henna to the women, the bride being last, into their palms and over their fingernails. Red fabric is then wrapped around each of the womenís hands and tied around the wrists. The next day the fabric and the henna paste are removed.  The designs are very simple within the Armenian culture, often using dipped fingertips.