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Mehndi MadnessTM Blog

Henna’s Medicinal Properties
By: Krysteen Lomonaco ~ 4/29/2014

Henna, or Lawsonia Enermis, is a shrub-like plant that grows native to southern and western Asia, and North Africa1. Henna powder comes from the dried leaves of the plant. Apart from having a visual effect on the skin (staining), many herbalists use Henna for medicinal purposes.

Studies have shown that Henna slows the heart rate, reduces blood pressure, decreases muscle spasms and inflammation, and can reduce fever and pain when ingested2.  Henna can also be used as a topical ointment when mixed with tea tree or cajeput oil for fungus or diabetic feet. The Lawsone, which is the property that causes the plant to stain the skin3, also carries antibacterial and antifungal properties that will heal dry, cracked, and infected skin. Some herbalists use Henna to treat stubborn warts or hands or feet4.

Another compound found in the Henna plant, Isoplumbagin, as well as Lawsone have been found to carry anti-cancer properties by protecting the sickle cells against membrane damage5.

Other uses for it include:

  • Treatment of burns and cuts
  • Experimental treatment for HIV
  • Ingested as capsules to prevent viruses like the flu

*Note: We are not suggesting to use Henna in place of traditional medicine, if you are interested in using Henna for medicinal purposes, consult your physician and herbalist*

1. http://www.mtoni.com/mrembo/henna.pdf
2. http://www.kew.org/plant-cultures/plants/henna_western_medicine.html
3. http://www.herbcraft.org/hena.html
4. http://www.islamicmedicine.org/henna.html
5. http://www.kew.org/plant-cultures/plants/henna_western_medicine.html