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Mehndi MadnessTM Blog

Henna VS Jagua
By: Krysteen Lomonaco ~ 7/9/2014

You hear us go on and on about henna, because it’s what we do and love! However, we do offer jagua body art as well. There are many similarities and differences between the two and today we’re going to tell you about them!

Jagua is indigenous to the rainforests of Central and South America. The staining substance comes from the fruit of the jagua tree, rather than the leaves, like the henna plant. Similarly to henna, jagua is known and used for its medicinal properties; both have antibacterial and antibiotic properties. Jagua is commonly used as cold and flu medicine, and it also is used to treat bronchitis and asthma.
Both plants are used to stain the skin. As mentioned earlier, the staining substance of the jagua comes from the fruit of the tree, which resembles a kiwi. The purpose of painting the skin with the juice from the fruit is for protection from insects and the sun, but is also used as decoration for the skin during celebrations and ceremonies.

Mehndi is traditionally done in intricate patterns that look like lace, whereas jagua designs are very geometric and angular. The “ink” that is made from the jagua fruit is also used to dye clothing and baskets.
When the juice of the jagua fruit oxidizes, it turns a blue/black color, which dyes the skin and other materials the same shade. Henna stains a reddish/brown depending on the soil the henna plant has grown in.
For more information on jagua, please visit our info page: http://mehndimadness.com/historyofjagua.asp

Photo References: Photo 1: http://jagua.us/
Photo 2: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jagua_Tattoo